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#SaraReads #GratitudeDuringCovid: Essay-Children look forward to future pandemics?

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Bookosmia Spotlight

Meghna Girishankar

Hey everyone! Your best friend Sara here. Hope the Eid festivities are in full swing. Today I bring to you this jolting essay from 16 year old Meghna of Mumbai asking all of us to strike balance in our normal lives, once all this is over.

#SaraReads #GratitudeDuringCovid: Essay-Children look forward to future pandemics?

Children look forward to future pandemics?

During a time when the world has been massively hit by the effects of COVID-19, with almost every individual facing its brunt, there might actually be a  certain set of them who are loving what the pandemic has to offer. And they are children.

Before we can even attempt to fathom the logic behind this, pessimistic  thoughts would have already started coalescing in our minds: How can one be  so self-centered? Aren’t such ill-fated thoughts purely selfish? But as the  saying goes, “Don’t judge one’s choices without understanding their reasons.” In order to truly comprehend this seemingly inexplicable desire of children for wanting future catastrophes akin to the prevalent one, we must analyse their  thought- process behind the same.

Children like to receive their parent’s undivided attention and to be loved, by engaging with their family. In the pre-corona world where both parents were  working, getting to play a game of chess or having a family movie date was almost unimaginable and tantamount to a privilege, for children. Working  parents would be consumed with their work lasting till the wee hours of the night. As a result, they barely, if at all, could make time for their children, who, all along, have become accustomed to this treatment.

Now, anything that reverses this trend, with children seeing more of their  parents around and getting to experience more quality time with them would definitely provoke feel-good vibes. And this is just what the pandemic has achieved. As parents are working from home, they have more time to bond with their kids over activities like cooking, gardening and dancing. Children are certainly liking this whole new experience of having their whims and fancies being addressed, and would want it to continue in the future as well.

However, they are anxious that this might only be a ‘limited period offer’. Post rehabilitation, once economic activity resumes, things would go back to being the way it used to be. Ingenuous as they are known to be, children hence feel that the outbreak of such pandemics is a good omen for them. We cannot entirely blame them for such thoughts, as they are young and oblivious to the fact that what they consider fair might not actually augur well with the rest of the society.

In fact, parents are partly to blame. If they had ensured to set aside time off  their other commitments to bond with their children on a regular basis, this notion wouldn’t have even crept into children’s minds.

It is a parent’s duty to reason with their kids that what they see as right, might  not necessarily be so, since it is quintessential to take cognizance of a broader viewpoint. This will only be instilled in children when parents are more involved in their child’s life. Parents should therefore make a conscious effort to maintain a healthy work-life balance so that children don’t feel left out.

After all, children do not remain juvenile forever, but while they do, better to cherish those priceless moments with them!

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